Minimalist

After traveling a bit to Moab, Shelf Road and the EPC, I have been contemplating, nay taking action on reducing, removing and recycling my unused belongings. In my travels I’ve met several people who are living minimally: the vanlife, the camper trailer life, a life with only few possessions, and what I’ve found as I shed belongings that I once thought dear, that we can get by without most things in our lives, and that in fact what we once possess comes to possess us. What we own we have to defend, or it takes up mental space cluttering not just the physical space, but the mental and spiritual space as well.

I’ve been getting rid of a box or two of books every day for the past week. I’ve shed several bags of clothing, and plan to get rid of much more. I am even contemplating getting rid of my house – either renting it out, or selling it out right.

Every item I remove I feel lighter – mentally and spiritually. I see what these minimalists that I mean talk about as I own one less thing.

When I started considering minimizing, I kept getting recommendations to read this book by a Japanese author The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up, by Marie Kondo. It got me to start thinking that there is a way I could start doing this – getting rid of crap.

In my former corporate life, where I was making 6 figures, and would walk into any store and point at anything I wanted – and just buy it.

Anything.

So I would just start to accumulate things, a motorcycle, a house, couches, expensive clothes, anything I wanted. I saw a jacket in San Francisco that cost over $600. Without a thought I would pull out my card and buy it on the spot.

But during the past 7 months of my 12 month sabbatical from work I’ve come to realize that these things need to go.

When I was out travelling in my 13′ Casita, through Shelf Road and up North by Northwest to Moab, with few possessions and a tiny home whose only way of powering up was through solar panels, that I was the happiest I have been in a long while. Nothing to hold me down or back or anything. I was responsible only for my own survival. And with survival taken cared of, I was responsible for everything else – my thoughts, my growth, my next adventure.

I just realized once I got back that I had to make big changes, and in order to make big changes, the first big change was to get rid of anything that I did not take any value from, that didn’t contribute to my life in a meaningful way.

Here is my start, follow me here to find out what happens on my minimalist journey.

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